The Power Company - robertwill
“My Daddy worked a lifetime…yeah
for the Power Company…
Turning night into day... yeah...yeah
for the Power Company"

- Eric Burdon


In Iceland, they don’t drill for oil and gas - they drill for hot water. Almost all Icelandic buildings are heated by hot water – piped direct from the earth’s core to them via a labyrinth of pipes spanning the country.

© Robert Will 2013<br />
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The Krafla area is home to the massive Krafla Geothermal Power Station. Krafla has proved to be an excellent site for geothermal power due to the close proximity of the magma to the surface (2-4 km).<br />
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This photo shows geothermal pipes in the hills near Krafla.

© Robert Will 2013

The Krafla area is home to the massive Krafla Geothermal Power Station. Krafla has proved to be an excellent site for geothermal power due to the close proximity of the magma to the surface (2-4 km).

This photo shows geothermal pipes in the hills near Krafla.

Geothermal energy is also being used to generate electricity, and geothermal power plants are being constructed to satisfy the country’s ever increasing demands for an economical source of electric power. One of largest of these is the Krafla Geothermal Power Station.
© Robert Will 2013<br />
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Mývatn Area and the Diamond Circle<br />
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The area surrounding Mývatn (Midge Lake) is one of the most volcanically active areas in Iceland. Located directly on the fault that separates the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates, the land is pulling apart at the same rate that fingernails grow. The fault is simultaneously shearing in a north/south direction.<br />
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The result is a "hot zone" that allows the visitor to see a lot of volcanic activity - all within a few km of the area's main town, Reykjahlíð.<br />
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Mývatn is also a great base for visiting some of Iceland's most spectacular waterfalls - Dettifoss, Selfoss, and Goðafoss.

© Robert Will 2013

Mývatn Area and the Diamond Circle

The area surrounding Mývatn (Midge Lake) is one of the most volcanically active areas in Iceland. Located directly on the fault that separates the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates, the land is pulling apart at the same rate that fingernails grow. The fault is simultaneously shearing in a north/south direction.

The result is a "hot zone" that allows the visitor to see a lot of volcanic activity - all within a few km of the area's main town, Reykjahlíð.

Mývatn is also a great base for visiting some of Iceland's most spectacular waterfalls - Dettifoss, Selfoss, and Goðafoss.

The Krafla Geothermal Power Station is situated in one of the most volcanically active areas in Iceland. Located directly on the fault that separates the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates, the land here is being pulled apart at the rate of several inches per year. The fault is simultaneously shearing in a north/south direction.

The result is a major geothermal "hot zone" with the volcano Krafla serving as the region’s unofficial bulls-eye.
© Robert Will 2013<br />
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Lava fountains from the "Krafla Fires" between 1724 and 1729 could be seen all the way to the south shore of Iceland.<br />
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Rather than erupting from a cone, Krafla opened up as a series of fissure vents over a wide area. The lava flow from the fissures extended all the way to Lake Mývatn.<br />
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Krafla last erupted in 1984, and is still VERY active.

© Robert Will 2013

Lava fountains from the "Krafla Fires" between 1724 and 1729 could be seen all the way to the south shore of Iceland.

Rather than erupting from a cone, Krafla opened up as a series of fissure vents over a wide area. The lava flow from the fissures extended all the way to Lake Mývatn.

Krafla last erupted in 1984, and is still VERY active.

When Krafla erupts, it doesn’t form the familiar cone that we associate with volcanoes – it erupts along a series of fissure vents - long tears in the surface of the earth – and spews molten lava over a wide area. Lava fountains from the "Krafla Fires" between 1724 and 1729 could be seen all the way to the south shore of Iceland. Krafla last erupted in 1984.

The magma is close to the surface here – very close, and that makes it an ideal source of geothermal energy. The Krafla Geothermal Power Station attempts to harness that energy by drilling deep wells that tap directly into the heat below. Superheated water and steam are then pumped to the Power Station’s turbines and used to generate electricity.
© Robert Will 2013<br />
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Pipes arch above the road at the Krafla Geothermal Power Station.

© Robert Will 2013

Pipes arch above the road at the Krafla Geothermal Power Station.

The Iceland Deep Drilling Project is a consortium of government agencies and utility companies trying to improve the economics of geothermal energy production by drilling much deeper wells in an attempt to tap into temperatures far in excess of what can otherwise be achieved.

In 2004, an IDDP drill unexpectedly entered a magma chamber at just over 2 km depth. The contact immediately melted both the drill head, and the thermometer provided to measure the temperatures encountered. Fortunately, the hole was capped without further incident.
© Robert Will 2013<br />
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According to Icelanders, the Iceland Deep Drilling Project came close to creating their own volcano when their drill bit hit magma and melted. <br />
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Fortunately, they were able to cap the drill hole without incident.

© Robert Will 2013

According to Icelanders, the Iceland Deep Drilling Project came close to creating their own volcano when their drill bit hit magma and melted.

Fortunately, they were able to cap the drill hole without incident.

Iceland’s goal is to be the World’s first 100% fossil-fuel-free nation.


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